Friendship as Sacred Knowing, by Samuel Kimbriel.

Kimbriel engages deeply with the human activity of friendship. Chapters one and two examine friendship to unearth the contours of the habit towards isolation and to reveal certain ills that have long attended it. Chapters three through seven place these isolated ways of relating to the world into critical dialogue with the tradition of late-antique and early-medieval Johannine Christianity, in which intimacy and understanding go hand in hand.
This Johannine tradition drew the human activities of friendship and enquiry into such unity that understanding itself became a kind of communion. Kimbriel endorses a return to an antique and particularly Christian philosophical habit-“the befriending of wisdom.”

Friendship as Sacred Knowing, by Samuel Kimbriel.

Kimbriel engages deeply with the human activity of friendship. Chapters one and two examine friendship to unearth the contours of the habit towards isolation and to reveal certain ills that have long attended it. Chapters three through seven place these isolated ways of relating to the world into critical dialogue with the tradition of late-antique and early-medieval Johannine Christianity, in which intimacy and understanding go hand in hand.

This Johannine tradition drew the human activities of friendship and enquiry into such unity that understanding itself became a kind of communion. Kimbriel endorses a return to an antique and particularly Christian philosophical habit-“the befriending of wisdom.”

The Biblical Literature designed & crafted for reading, separated into four elegant volumes, and free of all numbers, notes, etc.

(Reblogged from halcyonassassin)
Only people who are capable of loving strongly can also suffer great sorrow, but this same necessity of loving serves to counteract their grief and heals them. For this reason the moral nature of man is more active than the physical. Grief never kills.
You can’t manage people to be on the same page; you have to live together on the same page.
Reggie Joiner, think orange: imagine the impact when church and family collide… Page 132
There are only two ways to live your life: survival mode or prayer mode.
Mark Batterson, in a pit with a lion on a snowy day, page 136.

Beautiful cover on one of my all-time favorite novels.

(Source: books-and-barricades)

(Reblogged from dostoyevsky)

nprbooks:

Image via Getty

Today in Book NewsSalman Rushdie, novelist and target of a fatwa that forced him into hiding for yearshas won the 2014 PEN/Pinter Prize. The award is given every year to a British writer who, in the words of Harold Pinter, has an “unflinching, unswerving” gaze and “fierce intellectual determination … to define the real truth of our lives and our societies.” The prize will be presented at a ceremony in October. 

Also today, FSG’s Work in Progress blog has excerpts from Marilynne Robinson’s next novel, Lila, set in the set in the world of her Pulitzer-winning book Gilead. Colum McCann talks about his favorite writers and the Boston Review examines the difficulties of translating Proust (our favorite Friday Read).

Read more here.

(Reblogged from nprbooks)

mls:

USMNT’s path to the final (x).

(Reblogged from mls)