This is the basic epistemology of the Psalms; they are the word of God that brings us into a relation with God and a communion with each other, thus perfecting our divinely given capacity to know.
Francis Martin, Epistemology in the Psalms inThe Bible and Epistemology, page 50.
Faith is action, reducible to neither admiration nor knowledge. Neither the poet nor the philosopher, as such, has faith. The point of reflection on the Abraham story is neither to praise him nor to understand him but to imitate him. To do so rightly is to have faith, but to ‘go beyond’ him to poetry or philosophy, along with Kierkegaard’s romantic and idealistic contemporaries, is not to go on to something higher but to abandon a difficult task for an easier one.
Merold Westphal in Kierkegaard’s Concept of Faith, reflecting on Kierkegaard’s account of Abraham’s faith in Fear and Trembling (via eerdblurbs)
(Reblogged from eerdblurbs)

St. Paul’s Epistle to the Romans

This fall, the Bible study I attend and occasionally lead at my church will be studying St. Paul’s Epistle to the Romans. I’ve been reading a lot about St. Paul the past couple of years and I look forward to tackling the most comprehensive presentation of his theology. Anyone have good books on Paul or Romans or commentaries I should look at?

Then he opened their minds to understand the scriptures
Luke 24:45 ESV
Because of Christ, philosophy’s door has swung wide open. It no longer remains the province of a select few individuals, “gentlemanly” patrons and so forth, for divine wisdom has revealed itself in the form of a servant, enabling even the uneducated (like Monica) to take part in its possession
Ian Clausen, Awakening to Life: Augustine’s Admonition to (would-be) PhilosophersRadical Orthodoxy: Theology, Philosophy, Politics, Vol. 2, Number 2, Page 234. June 2014.
Augustine is too aware of the tendency to self-deception to present Christ as “answer” to a half-understood question.
Ian Clausen, Awakening to Life: Augustine’s Admonition to (would-be) Philosophers, Radical Orthodoxy: Theology, Philosophy, Politics, Vol. 2, Number 2, Page 230. June 2014.
In Augustine’s case, Cicero’s intuition about the nature of desire stands to confirm one’s genuine experience of seeking true wisdom. Attracted at one time to philosophical scepticism, Augustine knew enough not to trust it with the care of his soul since he recognised its ultimate endpoint was dissipation of desire, despair. Put another way, Cicero caused Augustine to “stand more upright” in the search for truth (Hortensius), only to fail at offering him any hope that his search might be fulfilled (Academica). The disjunction in Cicero’s philosophy between seeking truth and finding truth stands in contrast to the unity of Matthew 7:7, a verse Augustine uses to anchor his epistemology.
Ian Clausen, Awakening to Life: Augustine’s Admonition to (would-be) PhilosophersRadical Orthodoxy: Theology, Philosophy, Politics, Vol. 2, Number 2, Page 228-9. June 2014.
Having voiced these concerns about the perilous mountain, Augustine issues a final judgement on the “vainglory” of the pursuit. His point is that pride offers a temporary elevation at the expense of one’s desire to seek and find the truth. Eclipsing this desire leads to a false form of transcendence that threatens the stability and possibility of philosophy; for without desire, philosophy ceases to have relevance to life.
Ian Clausen, Awakening to Life: Augustine’s Admonition to (would-be) PhilosophersRadical Orthodoxy: Theology, Philosophy, Politics, Vol. 2, Number 2, Page 225. June 2014.
Friendship as Sacred Knowing, by Samuel Kimbriel.

Kimbriel engages deeply with the human activity of friendship. Chapters one and two examine friendship to unearth the contours of the habit towards isolation and to reveal certain ills that have long attended it. Chapters three through seven place these isolated ways of relating to the world into critical dialogue with the tradition of late-antique and early-medieval Johannine Christianity, in which intimacy and understanding go hand in hand.
This Johannine tradition drew the human activities of friendship and enquiry into such unity that understanding itself became a kind of communion. Kimbriel endorses a return to an antique and particularly Christian philosophical habit-“the befriending of wisdom.”

Friendship as Sacred Knowing, by Samuel Kimbriel.

Kimbriel engages deeply with the human activity of friendship. Chapters one and two examine friendship to unearth the contours of the habit towards isolation and to reveal certain ills that have long attended it. Chapters three through seven place these isolated ways of relating to the world into critical dialogue with the tradition of late-antique and early-medieval Johannine Christianity, in which intimacy and understanding go hand in hand.

This Johannine tradition drew the human activities of friendship and enquiry into such unity that understanding itself became a kind of communion. Kimbriel endorses a return to an antique and particularly Christian philosophical habit-“the befriending of wisdom.”